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April 23rd, 2015
GS1 Germany: Leitfaden für Nachhaltigkeitskommunikation vorgestellt


Das Online-Nachschlagewerk „Nachhaltigkeit von Produkten richtig bewerben – ein Leitfaden von A bis Z“ bietet Kommunikatoren einführende Informationen und Detailwissen zur produktbezogenen Nachhaltigkeitskommunikation. Entwickelt wurde das am Mittwoch in Köln vorgestellte Projekt von GS1 Germany gemeinsam mit Unternehmen.

March 31st, 2015
Erste Kennzahlen zum Antibiotika-Einsatz in Tiermast veröffentlicht


Mastbetriebe müssten nun anhand der Zahlen ermitteln, wie häufig sie Antibiotika im Bundesvergleich einsetzen.

March 30th, 2015
GRI, Integrated Reporting – Fragen und Antworten zu Entwicklungen im Reporting. Neue Workshop- und Kurstermine


Veranstaltungen zu Nachhaltigkeitsreporting und integrierter Berichterstattung, inklusive Coaching durch BSD Consulting. Lernen Sie die GRI-G4-Richtlinien in den GRI-zertifizierten Kursen kennen und anwenden, und erfahren Sie mehr über die Integration verschiedener Reporting-Rahmenwerke in unserem Workshop zum Thema Integration.

March 28th, 2015
Germanwings 4U9525: The art of asking the right questions



The crash of the Germanwings flight earlier this week is still dominating much of the (Western) news media. It is not just the fact that it happened with a well known Airline with a good safety record (Germanwings is a part of Lufthansa) right in the middle of Europe – in fact one of us sat on a Lufthansa A320 just a day before the crash. But it is also the absence of any good explanation as to the cause of the crash.


Now that story has evolved over the last hours. First, we learned from the voice recorder of the black box that the co-pilot was alone in the cockpit and did not open the door for the pilot to come back after his toilet break. It was interesting to see how Lufthansa, the prosecutors and most media then jumped to the conclusion that the co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane.


While that is indeed one option, only few reports raised the question why the flight data recorder – the other black box – could not be found. Or why when it was found the hard disk with the data was missing. Because only those data would clearly document which actions the co-pilot actually took while alone in the cockpit. It is still conceivable, that we saw a repeat of an incident on a Lufthansa A321 just five months ago when iced sensors sent the plane on route from Bilbao to Munich on a similar descent and could only be saved by the pilot switching off the autopilot.


And maybe it was not suicidal intent but other forms of incapacitation that made the co-pilot behave that way. After all, as we finally learned today, he had a history of psychological problems and should in fact have been on sick leave rather than flying.


Nearly unanimously, most commentators jumped to the conclusion that his medical condition just proves that the plane was brought down intentionally by a mentally sick individual. And in particular Lufthansa appeared to be relieved to identify a rare singular individual case as the reason for the accident – rather than technical or other reasons which might have put the company in a much trickier position.


Or does it? After all, air crashes have a long history as case material and illustrative incidents in the business ethics debate. Even if we assume that an individual is to blame - more often than not such behavior occurs in a specific organizational context which normally leads to this behavior. One of the most recent examples is certainly the 2009 Crash of the Colgan Air  commuter plane in Buffalo (similar to this week’s case, a supplier of Continental Airways), which initially all looked like pilot error. However, as a brilliant PBS documentary illustrates, this incident revealed a host of unethical practices and infractions not just with the airline but in fact with the wider industry.


So, this is the time to ask the right questions. The first of which would be to get some more insight as to why the co-pilot did conceal his mental illness from his employer. Does Germanwings have a procedure for this? Do they just fire people like him, when such condition is revealed? Do they care?


A next question would be how on earth his depression could have gone unnoticed by his colleagues? After all, pilots spend a lot of time together and observe each other from up-close. How could it be that the pilot was totally comfortable to leave this co-pilot in charge for a couple of minutes? What does this say about the culture at Germanwings? Does anybody care about how his colleagues are doing?


The more important questions would look at the wider context of work in the airline. Germanwings recently had strikes as Lufthansa tries to impose a low wage no frills-system of wages and working conditions on their low cost branch, which competes with the likes of Easyjet or Ryanair. This is an object of fierce dispute and Lufthansa itself is in a middle of a merciless battle with their pilots. Just last week, thousands of flights on Lufthansa were cancelled due to a strike. This climate does not exactly encourage a young aspiring pilot – on the way to live his childhood dream – to expect an empathetic reception when broaching his personal issues.


The problematic working conditions at other low cost carriers are by now common currency. So the question we have to ask is in how far Lufthansa has made its subsidiary Germanwings in nothing but a clone of Ryanair and the others. This raises the question if we are actually talking about an environment where someone with mental health issues would think the last thing to disclose to his employer and to hope for empathy would be his personal troubles and problems?


Overall then, there are a lot of questions to ask to Lufthansa, the investigating bodies, and in fact the media. But there are also larger questions unanswered. European pilots associations now openly challenge why so many facts of an ongoing investigation are leaked to the press. Or why certain questions, most notably about the flight data recorder have not been addressed. One cannot help but having some uncomfortable reminiscences with the disappearance of MH370 in South East Asia about a year ago. As the even the CEO of Emirates, Sir Tim Clark (far from being one of the inevitable conspiracy theorists in these incidents), has very vocally set out, the way the public gets (dis-)informed about those disasters raises serious questions. Questions, to which we ultimately need an answer.



Image copyright Plane13.com, Reproduced under Creative Commons Licence


March 28th, 2015
Germanwings 4U9525: The art of asking the right questions



The crash of the Germanwings flight earlier this week is still dominating much of the (Western) news media. It is not just the fact that it happened with a well known Airline with a good safety record (Germanwings is a part of Lufthansa) right in the middle of Europe – in fact one of us sat on a Lufthansa A320 just a day before the crash. But it is also the absence of any good explanation as to the cause of the crash.


Now that story has evolved over the last hours. First, we learned from the voice recorder of the black box that the co-pilot was alone in the cockpit and did not open the door for the pilot to come back after his toilet break. It was interesting to see how Lufthansa, the prosecutors and most media then jumped to the conclusion that the co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane.


While that is indeed one option, only few reports raised the question why the flight data recorder – the other black box – could not be found. Or why when it was found the hard disk with the data was missing. Because only those data would clearly document which actions the co-pilot actually took while alone in the cockpit. It is still conceivable, that we saw a repeat of an incident on a Lufthansa A321 just five months ago when iced sensors sent the plane on route from Bilbao to Munich on a similar descent and could only be saved by the pilot switching off the autopilot.


And maybe it was not suicidal intent but other forms of incapacitation that made the co-pilot behave that way. After all, as we finally learned today, he had a history of psychological problems and should in fact have been on sick leave rather than flying.


Nearly unanimously, most commentators jumped to the conclusion that his medical condition just proves that the plane was brought down intentionally by a mentally sick individual. And in particular Lufthansa appeared to be relieved to identify a rare singular individual case as the reason for the accident – rather than technical or other reasons which might have put the company in a much trickier position.


Or does it? After all, air crashes have a long history as case material and illustrative incidents in the business ethics debate. Even if we assume that an individual is to blame - more often than not such behavior occurs in a specific organizational context which normally leads to this behavior. One of the most recent examples is certainly the 2009 Crash of the Colgan Air  commuter plane in Buffalo (similar to this week’s case, a supplier of Continental Airways), which initially all looked like pilot error. However, as a brilliant PBS documentary illustrates, this incident revealed a host of unethical practices and infractions not just with the airline but in fact with the wider industry.


So, this is the time to ask the right questions. The first of which would be to get some more insight as to why the co-pilot did conceal his mental illness from his employer. Does Germanwings have a procedure for this? Do they just fire people like him, when such condition is revealed? Do they care?


A next question would be how on earth his depression could have gone unnoticed by his colleagues? After all, pilots spend a lot of time together and observe each other from up-close. How could it be that the pilot was totally comfortable to leave this co-pilot in charge for a couple of minutes? What does this say about the culture at Germanwings? Does anybody care about how his colleagues are doing?


The more important questions would look at the wider context of work in the airline. Germanwings recently had strikes as Lufthansa tries to impose a low wage no frills-system of wages and working conditions on their low cost branch, which competes with the likes of Easyjet or Ryanair. This is an object of fierce dispute and Lufthansa itself is in a middle of a merciless battle with their pilots. Just last week, thousands of flights on Lufthansa were cancelled due to a strike. This climate does not exactly encourage a young aspiring pilot – on the way to live his childhood dream – to expect an empathetic reception when broaching his personal issues.


The problematic working conditions at other low cost carriers are by now common currency. So the question we have to ask is in how far Lufthansa has made its subsidiary Germanwings in nothing but a clone of Ryanair and the others. This raises the question if we are actually talking about an environment where someone with mental health issues would think the last thing to disclose to his employer and to hope for empathy would be his personal troubles and problems?


Overall then, there are a lot of questions to ask to Lufthansa, the investigating bodies, and in fact the media. But there are also larger questions unanswered. European pilots associations now openly challenge why so many facts of an ongoing investigation are leaked to the press. Or why certain questions, most notably about the flight data recorder have not been addressed. One cannot help but having some uncomfortable reminiscences with the disappearance of MH370 in South East Asia about a year ago. As the even the CEO of Emirates, Sir Tim Clark (far from being one of the inevitable conspiracy theorists in these incidents), has very vocally set out, the way the public gets (dis-)informed about those disasters raises serious questions. Questions, to which we ultimately need an answer.



Image copyright Plane13.com, Reproduced under Creative Commons Licence


March 23rd, 2015
Rapex: Kindersandalen mit Erstickungsgefahr und Schmuck mit Schwermetallen


Kindersandalen mit Erstickungsgefahr und Modeschmuck mit Schwermetallen: Zwei Beispiele aus dem Bericht über rund 2500 gefährliche Waren, die vergangenes Jahr in Europa aus dem Verkehr gezogen werden mussten. Das EU-Schnellwarnsystem Rapex verzeichnete 2435 Warnmeldungen und damit erneut mehr als im Jahr zuvor, wie die EU-Kommission am Montag in Brüssel mitteilte. Vor allem von Spielzeug sowie Textilien, Kleidern und Modeartikeln gingen demnach Risiken aus.

January 19th, 2015
EU will weniger Antibiotika in der Tiermast


Antibiotika solle "nicht mehr standardmäßig unter das Tierfutter gemischt" werden können, "quasi als Vorbeugung gegen Krankheiten", sagte Gesundheitskommissar Vytenis Andriukaitis dem "Tagesspiegel".

January 2nd, 2015
SZ: Risiken multiresistenter Keime aus der Tiermast


Bisher hätten resistente Erreger aus der Tierhaltung in Krankenhäusern wenig Schaden angerichtet, da diese zwar unempfindlich gegen Antibiotika aus der Tierhaltung, nicht aber gegen solche aus der Humanmedizin seien.

November 24th, 2014
Schweizer Startup „Sharely“: Vermieter teilen Alltagsgegenstände eher als Mieter


Bohrmaschinen, Laminiergeräte, und Hochdruckreiniger sind Gegenstände, die in vielen Haushalten nur hin und wieder gebraucht werden. Da dies aus ökonomischer und ökologischer Perspektive nicht nachhaltig ist, starteten Andreas Amstutz und Claudia Jork 2013 die Internetseite Sharely, eine Schweizer Miet- und Vermietplattform für Alltagsgegenstände.

November 18th, 2014
Bundesweit Aktionen zu Abfallvermeidung und Lebensmittelverschwendung


Vom 22. bis zum 30. November 2014 findet die Europäische Woche der Abfallvermeidung (EWAV) statt. Zum fünften Mal werden damit in den europäischen Mitgliedstaaten verschiedene Aktionen veranstaltet, die konkrete Ansätze für Abfallvermeidung, Wiederverwendung und Recycling in Industrie, Gewerbe, Haushalt und in Behörden veranschaulichen.

November 15th, 2014
E-Energy – smart grid made in Germany: B.A.U.M. legt der Bundesregierung Ergebnisse aus dem mehrjährigen Forschungsprogramm vor


Über 60 Mio. € Fördermittel stellten BMWi und BMU in den vergangenen 4 Jahren 6 Modellregionen zur Demonstration von Smart Grid-Technologie und dem Aufbau von virtuellen Marktplätzen auf Verteilnetzebene bereit, um deren Beiträge zu den Herausforderungen der Energiewende (Dezentralisierung, Fluktuierende Erzeugung, Versorgungssicherheit) zu erforschen.

November 7th, 2014
Psychische Krankheiten am Arbeitsplatz: Stigmatisierung vermeiden


Genf (csr-news) > Aufgrund des Stigmas und den damit verbundenen Ängsten waren psychische Krankheiten immer ein schwieriges Thema in der Welt der Arbeit. „Psychische Krankheit“ bezieht sich nicht nur auf schwere Pathologien, sondern auch auf weitverbreitete Störungen, wie Depressionen, Angstzustände oder „Burnout“, alles



November 6th, 2014
Luxemburg: Dax-Konzerne sparen Steuermilliarden


Durch von der Luxemburger Regierung genehmigte Firmenkonstruktionen haben Dax-Konzerne und internationale Firmen teilweise weniger als ein Prozent ihrer Gewinne versteuern müssen.

November 1st, 2014
Arbeitgebermarke NWB: Nachhaltig miteinander


Der NWB Verlag in Herne hat eine Kampagne zur Arbeitgebermarke entwickelt. Das, was den NWB Verlag auszeichnet und differenziert, sind die Bereiche Wissen, Werte, Vielfalt, Menschen und Heimat – dabei spielt gerade das nachhaltige Wirtschaften eine besondere Rolle für das Unternehmen.

October 31st, 2014
Mehlwürmer, Heuschrecken und Mottenlarven im Supermarkt


Die zweitgrößte Supermarkt-Kette in den Niederlanden bietet seit Freitag Fast-Food und Snacks aus Mehlkäfern, Heuschrecken und Mottenlarven an. Im vergangenen Jahr rief die Ernährungs- und Landwirtschaftsorganisation der Vereinten Nationen (FAO) die noch zögerlichen westlichen Verbraucher auf, ihre Abscheu vor Insekten herunterzuschlucken.

October 13th, 2014
Soziale und ökologische Nachhaltigkeit deutscher Supermärkte


Ohne ein entsprechendes Angebot des Lebensmitteleinzelhandels ist es für Konsumenten nur schwer möglich Nachhaltigkeit und Fairness beim Einkauf zu berücksichtigen. Zwölf der bekanntesten Lebensmittelmärkte hat die Organisation „Rank a brand“ für ihr diesjähriges Supermarkt-Ranking unter die Lupe genommen. Wie halten es die Märkte mit dem Klima- und Umweltschutz und welches Angebot fair produzierter Waren finden sich in ihren Regalen? Einige Anbieter haben sich gegenüber dem Vorjahr verbessert.

October 7th, 2014
21. Oktober: AmCham Germany Business After Hours in München


Die Vorträge widmen sich dem Feld des gesellschaftlichen Engagements von Unternehmen und zeigen konkret, warum es hier ein besonderes Erfordernis für Innovation und Differenzierung gibt und weswegen der herkömmliche Weg über einfache Spenden und Sponsoring durch Unternehmen nicht mehr für echten Erfolg ausreicht. Darauf aufbauend werden dann ausgewählte innovative Kooperationsformen zwischen Wirtschaft und Non-Profit-Organisationen erläutert und mit praktischen Beispielen belegt.

October 2nd, 2014
Ackermann über Boni-System und den Verlust von Ethik


Der ehemalige Vorstandsvorsitzende der Deutschen Bank, Josef Ackermann, hat im Rückblick auf die 2008 ausgebrochene Finanzkrise Selbstkritik geübt.

September 26th, 2014
„Kindermund tut Wahrheit kund“: Die Kaufland-Nachhaltigkeitswochen


Ein nachhaltiges Warenangebot braucht Kundeninteresse, sonst ist es schnell aus den Regalen verschwunden. Die von preissensiblen Kunden bevorzugten Discounter stellt das vor eine besondere Herausforderung. Unter dem Motto „Kaufland denkt eine Generation weiter“ startete eine Handelskette am Montag zwei Nachhaltigkeitswochen. „Es ist ein wachsendes Interesse zu spüren“, sagt Hergen Blase, Geschäftsbereichsleiter Nachhaltigkeit/CSR bei Kaufland.

September 22nd, 2014
Erneut Austritt giftiger Substanzen aus Kupfermine in Mexiko


In Mexiko sind aus einer Kupfermine im nordwestlichen Buenavista erneut giftige Substanzen ausgetreten.
















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